More Myanmar parents are willing to send their children to t

 school because speaking fluent Chinese is necessary for them to work in China or do business with China, Sun said.

The government in Ruili has invested 2.6 million yuan ($388,000) in impro

ving school facilities, including building a new school building, canteen and playground. T

he school has established a special foundation with donations from teachers, parents and officers at the in

spection station to sponsor impoverished Chinese and Burmese students in pursuing their studies, he said.

Ruili, an important land port for southwestern China, is described by a famous C

hinese song, There is a Beautiful Place, which describes its natural beauty and colorful folklore.

At the school, the students also can be heard singing another so

ng, “Two countries, one school, hand in hand, heart to heart, forever love.”

www.qhfccc.com

On March 13, CNBC reported that Malta, an island nation i

the Mediterranean that is also a EU member state, has indicated it, too, could join the BRI. The news channel quoted Maltes

e Finance Minister Edward Scicluna as saying that “certain prejudices” should not come in the way of good business.

I am not sure if Marquis, or his boss, US National Security Advisor John Bolton, plan to lecture, warn or th

reaten Malta as they have been doing to Italy these past days. But instead of indulging in such rea

ctionary activities, the US should abandon its Cold War mentality and stop looking for non-existent enemies.

More important, the US should also stop forcing other countries to ch

oose between China and the US, especially as many countries made it clear they do not wan

t to be lectured on what they should do when the Obama administration launched the “pivot to Asia strategy”.

The world needs more infrastructure-building projects such as the BRI, not mo

ves to sabotage such projects, as the US has been trying to do for quite some time now.

qianhuaorg.com

As dawn broke, those sobs began to make sense as a “ter

  rible sight” emerged, Taylor said.

  ”Dead bodies had floated up (and the) current of the flood water had washed the bodies up against the road,” said Tay

lor. “The road had subsided about 10 inches (25.5 centimeters). So these bodies had been washed up against the main highway.”

  Taylor said the smell of bodies and livestock was palpable.Hundreds of others were also attempting to make the congested seven-ho

ur walk from the village of Lamego — about 90 kilometers (56 miles) inland from Beira — to Nhamatanda, on higher ground. In places whe

re the current of the flood waters was strong, about 50 people joined hands to make a human chain, said Taylor.

  ”I’m 6 foot 2 inches (187 centimeters), but the force of water at knee level w

as powerful,” Taylor said. “You had to pay attention and concentrate where you put your feet.”

  Taylor said he saw an elderly woman carry her husband on her back.

  On the road out of Beira, he said “the entire area, as far as I could see, was one lake of flood

water,” adding that groups of up to 10 people had climbed eucalyptus, cashew and mango trees waiting to be rescued.

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After hitting Mozambique, Cyclone Idai tore into Zimbabwe

  killing many people as they slept.

  The 83-year-old husband of one Chimanimani resident was buried alive when their bedroom collapsed on them last Friday.

  ”We were sleeping in the house around 10 p.m. in the evening and it was raining. It

kept on pouring when rocks sliding from the hill started hitting our house,” said the 59-year-old.

  ”The stones we built our house with collapsed on us, and then I yelled, ‘oh my, I’m dying!’ The soils had

filled my mouth, nose and ears. Water filled the house to almost my neck level … I started to shake my husband’s body to no avail. He was alrea

dy dead.”People carry Chinese rice from a warehouse surrounded by water after Cyclone Idai hit the area, in Beira, Mozambique.

  Nearby, another family had abandoned searching for their 16-year-old missing son, who they suspect is buried under the mud.

  Efforts to bring aid to those affected by Cyclone Idai are under way in Zimbabwe. Pres

ident Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government is airlifting food to some of the areas where people are still trapped.

  Mnangagwa has declared March 23 and 24 national days of mourning.

www.aishes021.org

Brexit is costing the UK economy $1 billion a week. And it could

  rexit has been delayed, and may eventually be called off. But it’s already done major damage to the UK economy.

  The vote to leave the European Union in June 2016 caused the pound to weaken drama

tically and ushered in years of uncertainty that has reduced economic activity and triggered a slump in investment.

  The economy is now 2% smaller than it would have been if the United Kingdom had chosen to remain in the bloc, according to the Bank of England. The econ

omic output lost since the referendum is worth about £800 million ($1 billion) per week, or £4.7 million ($6 million) per hour.

  The economic consequences have piled up despite there having been no struct

ural changes yet to Britain’s trading relationship with EU nations or the rest of the world.

  Britain has continued to sell goods and services into the European Un

ion, its biggest trading partner, while politicians worked to negotiate the divorce. It has been

easy for UK companies to hire EU workers, and to maintain supply chains that crisscross national borders

aishes021.org

Stunning subway station lights up Chongqings a train leaving a

  The question many New Zealanders are asking themselves in the wake of Friday’s deadly terrorist attacks on two mosques is: Why?

  Why was this island nation with fewer than 5 million people in the southwestern c

orner of the Pacific chosen for such a savage crime? Why should there be attacks on men, women an

d children who have gathered to pray? Why couldn’t the white supremacist be prevented from going on the killing spree?

  In native Maori language New Zealand is “Aotearoa”, or roughly the “land of the long w

hite cloud” which appeared to offer a quiet sanctuary from many of the evils that beset our world today.

  All that changed last Friday. By a crime of pure hate.

  The brutality of the attacks in Christchurch has stunned New Zealanders. It

was the sort of thing that happened in “other places”. They thought their land is a “proud nation” of more than 200 ethnic gr

oups and 160 languages-a land of diversity in which “we share common values”, as Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has said.

sh419af.com

Some have said the killings robbed New Zealand of its i

innocence. But that is probably being too simplistic as we live in a complex world.

Indeed, New Zealand is about as far away as you can get from the violence we see alm

ost daily in other war-torn places. That is not to say New Zealand has been immune to violence.

The quiet seaside town of Aramoana, near Dunedin, saw 13 people gunned down in No

vember 1990 when a local resident went berserk after an argument with his next-door neighbor. Five years lat

er, in April 1995, across the Tasman Sea in Australia, there was the Port Arthur massacre on the island state of Tas

mania where 35 people were killed by a lone gunman. That was an act of pure evil rather than of hate or race.

Both acts of violence saw changes to gun laws. In Australia’s case, it w

as a radical overhaul. New Zealand will change its gun laws in 10 days, said Ardern on Monday. In N

ew Zealand, it is estimated 250,000 gun-owners own about 1.5 million firearms and the laws governing guns are weak and exploited.

www.aishedese.com

He went into hiding in 1996 and was finally arrested in 2008

Serbian capital, Belgrade. Karadzic was heavily disguised by a white beard, long

hair and spectacles, living under a false identity as a “spiritual healer.”

Karadzic is the highest-ranking political figure to have been brought to justice over the bitter ethnic conflicts of the 1990s.

Wednesday’s judgement was handed down by the UN’s international residual mechanism for cr

iminal tribunals, which deals with cases left over from the now dissolved courts for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

In November 2017 the court also sentenced former Bosnian Serb army leader Ratko Mladi

c to life in prison after finding him guilty of genocide for atrocities committed during the Bosnian war from 1992 to 1995.

Mladic was charged with two counts of genocide and nine crim

es against humanity and war crimes for his role in the conflict in the former Yugoslavia fro

m 1992 to 1995, during which 100,000 people were killed and another 2.2 million displaced.

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The bank, a subsidiary of the South African Absa Group, sai

id the money was not part of its deposit, and the contents of the safe deposit box were only known to the owner, adding that it was working with the police in the investigation.

“The customer had concealed fake currency in his personal safe deposit box against the bank’s rules and regulations whic

h include restrictions of items which can be held in the safe deposit box,” Barclays Kenya said in a statement.

Kenya promotes wildlife heritage on new currency coins

The currency seizure comes as lawmakers in the country push for the implem

entation of a policy that removes strict banking laws mandating financial institutions to record transactions above $10,000.

Kenya’s apex bank chief Patrick Njoroge opposed the amendment sayi

ng it could derail the fight against corruption and money laundering in the country.

A case challenging the implementation of the amendments is due to be heard in Kenya’s High Court

sh419hh.com

Authorities said the assailant obtained the firearms used

  in the attack through legal means. Ardern and Deputy Prime Mi

nister Winston Peters announced Monday evening that the cabinet has agreed to ch

anges to New Zealand’s gun laws “in principle,” but the exact measures have not been revealed.

  While acknowledging that “for a short period” the planned amendments might create uncertainty for some gun own

ers, Ardern said she believes “the vast majority” of New Zealand’s gun owners agree that change is needed.

  Tech companies face increased scrutiny

  Some of Ardern’s toughest rhetoric was reserved for social

media and its ability to quickly disseminate “ideas and language of division and hate.”

  ”We cannot simply sit back and accept that these platforms

just exist and that what is said on them is not the responsibility of the place where they are pu

blished. They are the publisher. Not just the postman. There cannot be a case of all profit no responsibility,” she said.

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